Tag Archives: income tax preparation

Summer is the Perfect Time to Do Tax Planning for Now and 2023


The summer is a good time to take a break. Head to the beach. Take a few weeks off. All of that is good and healthy.

However, summer is also a great time to do some minimal tax planning. It won’t take a lot of time to do it and you can still enjoy your summer. Trust us, you can take a few substantial steps now that will help you later.

So, before you pack the cooler and swimsuits, let’s do a few things:

  1. Retirement planning: You can still make plans by allowing for employer contributions to be made until the extended due date of the return. One way to do it is by making the maximum allowable contribution to your retirement plan. This year, 401(k) and 403(b) have a $20,500 contribution limit. There is also a $6,500 contribution for taxpayers who reach age 50 by 12/31/22. 
  2. Real Estate holdings: The DMV area has a hot real estate market. So §1031 can be used by rolling proceeds from a sale into the like-kind property within a timeframe. (It is specific and must be followed to the letter.)
  3. Capital gains: You may want to defer the tax liability with an Opportunity Zone investment. This is reinvesting capital gains in an Opportunity Zone within a 180-day window. Then defer the tax on the original gain until December 31, 2026. Opportunity Zone investments can be held for ten years as they will not be taxed by the IRS. 
  4. Depreciation: Depreciation, for business owners, need not be determined when the asset (business property) is used. Bonus depreciation is already automatic. “Out of bonus” depreciation can be claimed for each asset class. Attach a statement to the timely-filed tax return and then depreciate the asset over its life. 
  5. Required Minimum Distributions: Your brokerage can pay your RMD directly to the charity you designate. A qualified charitable distribution (QCD) is not recognized as income. It keeps your adjusted gross income lower, and it may even reduce Medicare premiums. You can still make the standard deduction but remember that you can only claim a total of $100,000 per tax year.
  6. Donor-advised funds: You are allowed to take a tax deduction in the year that cash or other assets are transferred to a DAF. They can be invested until you recommend the DAF distribute the funds to all of the charities you support. You are not taxed on interest, gains, and dividends generated by investments made by the DAF. It’s a great way to accomplish tax planning goals. You can also claim a deduction for the fair market value of the donated assets and not have to pay capital gains tax on the appreciation.

These are just a few of the ways you can plan for your 2022 tax returns and beyond. Be sure to consult the IRS, your tax advisor, or your accountant. ***

AK Burton, PC, knows the current tax laws and how to work with the IRS. Our experienced tax preparers can file your business and personal tax returns and represent you to the IRS. Call us at (301) 365-1974 for a consultation. 

We serve the Bethesda, Rockville, and Montgomery County, MD area.

*** For more information on tax preparation, visit the IRS website

How to Avoid an Audit on Your 2021 Tax Returns

Audit!

That word sends shivers into any honest taxpayer. You do everything you know to do on your tax returns. Your CPA has signed it and filed it. 

However, despite all that, the audit notice from the IRS has arrived. You’re stressed.

It doesn’t have to be that way. You can avoid an audit on your 2021 tax returns if you take the right preventative steps to do it. Here are some smart and legal ways to do it: 

    1. Don’t lie or attempt to cheat the IRS: This is the first and foremost reason! SO many people try to cheat the IRS every year. Some get away with it but most do not. Besides that, it’s just wrong. Dishonest tax filers claim excessive or unreasonable tax deductions. They are so obvious, that the IRS flags them and begins investigating. Their agents will ask for additional information. If discrepancies are found, the agency may levy penalties. Instead, be truthful in all your deductions and credits.
    2. Keep accurate and detailed records: There is a boatload of different forms that are available based on deductions and income. They can be confusing and it’s easy to make mistakes or forget them. Thus, the importance of keeping accurate and thorough records during the year. Keep all expense receipts in a file labeled for that year. That file should be accessible at all times. File your taxes only when you have all the required forms so you won’t have to amend your tax return.
    3. Don’t overdo it with your home office deduction. Self-employed people who have businesses in their homes are considered independent contractors. The deductions designated for that should be “reasonable” as the IRS defines it or it may become a huge red flag, especially if the home office is where you derive most of your income. So, claim just a percentage of your mortgage or rent that is your true workspace. Other expenses, such as phone, AC/heat, supplies, and other expenses can be claimed as business-related.
    4. File electronically. A good way to avoid audits is to file them online. The IRS encourages this for one big reason: paper filing usually contains many more errors than electronic files. Hard copy errors are 21% as electronic filing is 0.5%. The IRS software has protections in place so that filers have fewer errors. 
    5. Hire an experienced bookkeeper, accountant, or CPA. Tax laws change every year. It’s almost impossible to keep up with them unless you are an accounting professional. So, protect yourself and hire an accountant or bookkeeper to file your taxes for you. Most good accountants will also represent you to the IRS, which can be invaluable to prevent an audit. 

Tax Day is April 18, 2022, which is only a few weeks away as we publish this blog. No one wants to be audited. It can be agonizing. If you have not done the above steps or wonder if you are going to be audited, please contact an accountant for a consultation. 

AK Burton, PC, knows the current tax laws and how to work with the IRS. Our experienced tax preparers can file your business and personal tax returns and represent you to the IRS. Call us at (301) 365-1974 for a consultation. 

We serve the Bethesda, Rockville, and Montgomery County, MD area.

Income Tax Preparation: How You Can Get Your Tax Refund ASAP

The good news is that the IRS gave us an extra month to file our tax returns for 2020. It is May 17, 2021, and not April 15, 2021. ***

The bad news is that it may take a while to receive your tax refund.

It is frustrating, especially if you need the refund to catch up on bills you may have accumulated during the COVID crisis. Here are several ways you can get your tax refund quicker:

  1. E-File: Submit your tax returns electronically versus mailing your tax return in.
  2. Confirm that you have all your income documents before you file. You should have all of your 2020 income documents by now, but if you don’t, get them before you file. If you don’t have them and file your return, then you might have to amend your return(s). 
  3. Double-check your mailing address. This one is crucial! The IRS contacts you by mail for required updates on your tax return. Make sure your mailing address is correct so that you will receive all correspondence, (including a refund check), from the IRS. 
  4. Double-check your bank information on your return. If you choose direct deposit to speed up receiving your refund but fail to provide the correct bank account information, then you won’t receive your refund by direct deposit. 
  5. Check all your ID numbers. IRS has every citizen’s name and address on file. Each name has a unique ID number that is tied to the name, birthdate, income amount, and social security number. 
  6. Confirm that you are the only one claiming your dependent(s). If you know someone who could also claim your dependent on their tax return, then verify who will be claiming the dependent(s). If a dependent is claimed by more than one person, then the second tax return to claim them will be rejected by the IRS. 

Have a Certified Public Accountant file your tax returns for you. Tax laws are notoriously complicated and change year to year. So, save yourself the stress and fees by hiring a CPA to file your taxes for you. They can file them and represent you before the IRS. What’s not to like?!

As of this blog posting, there are still a few weeks left before the May 17, 2021 posting. Have you done all of the above?

A.K. Burton, PC, can do all your income tax preparation. We have experienced staff who can prepare and file your tax return and represent you before the IRS. Call us at (301) 365-1974 for a consultation. Our office is open. At this time we are not providing in-person services because of the pandemic. We serve the Bethesda, Rockville, and Montgomery County, MD area.

*** See the IRS website for updates on the new tax return due date for 2021.